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The beginning of a track. 1:32 scale
#11

You really won’t know what sort of track you want until you drive it.  Try a few different layouts to find out what you like.  Also try your cars with and without magnets because the driving experience is very different.  Non-magnet means you need to do a little prep on your tyres but it can be very rewarding with the added bonus of slower lap times but more controllability.  But if you are after speed then keep the magnets.

I tried 3 or 4 layout options before I settled on my favourite and it was different from my theoretical favourite.

[i]Slot cars are not life and death.  They are so much more than that[/i]  Cool
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#12

(7th-Oct-19, 11:00 AM)Skogis Wrote:  Thank you Jason for these tracks. The first track you posted that looks like a triangle did really speak to me. it left room to reach from each side and also contains some scenic patches. That's a big plus.

The elevation isn't as high as I want it. But I am sure it is high enough since we are working on such a limited space. Important to not overdo it either. I like the tracks with difference in elevation because I think it adds a new dimension of the whole track and scenery.

I like the turns that are on the left so I can make them part of the climb up on top. That looks really nice. 

Is it possible to make the start/stop on the left side. For easier access to set up the cars for a race ? My pitlane is also on the "Inner side" of the track when you drive from right to left. I dont know if it is reversable.

Is there a possibility to get the start/stop on the left side

You're welcome. I love elevation changes too, but you can always use some boxes and books to set those up temporarily to find out how much elevation change you want. As Mr Modifier has said it's always wise to try out your track before you commit to it.

The trouble with having the pit lane on the inside of the track would be that the fuel station would face away from the drivers, and you'd only see the back of any buildings, which would then obscure the fuel pumps etc. You could of course run the track clockwise, ie reverse the direction shown to make it work with your pit lane pieces, and keep the fuel station facing the front.

The start/finish could presumably go wherever there is space for the pwerbase, it doesn't need to be on the main straight. And since your pit lane is not a traditional pit garage affair, the start/finish doesn't need to be anywhere near it.
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#13

Splitting the power base from its track piece is another option.  It gives you better options to position the start/finish and allows you to put the controls and throttle sockets where it suits you.  Cat5 cable is good for the data cables but make sure the power cables are thicker.

I did this so the APB is in the centre of the front edge of my track table but on a unit underneath the table.  The start/finish is about 2 metres away at the end of my long straight.

[i]Slot cars are not life and death.  They are so much more than that[/i]  Cool
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#14

Thank you both. Yeah I will probably have to set up a few tracks and try them before going for one or another.

You both have good points that I would never thought of. 


That one lane track. Is it "normal" to have a digital track as a one lane track? 

I was thinking a little than I possible would get more track if I went with a one slot track. 

There is so many options with slotcars and so many approches and I am very greatful for recieving your input. 

-sk
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#15

No it's definitely not "normal". It was more to show that with a J-Trak system you can have variations by swapping modules.

In fact a one lane track would barely count as digital as you wouldn't be able to change lanes. I'm not even sure whether it would be compatible with a digital powerbase. Perhaps one of our digital experts will pop in and advise us.
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#16

The minus with digital is those chips. 

But i guess you could run digital and have pitlanes to change into a new part of the track. 
If it is worth it - that is a different case. 

There is so much things to take into consideration. Since i will drive on it alone i will mostly do timed runs. I like the pace cars. But they are mostly just "traffic" and not a real challenge like a human would be. At least I have not figured that out yet.
I imagne that a one slot track will give more lenght to the track aswell.  Bigsmile

Have you ever made a "rallytrack"? I see that Rallyhub have made some incredible pieces. But I those are routed tracks.

Do you have any experience with routed tracks? 

Regards SK
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#17

Why are chips a minus?
You technically only need 6 if you have DPR cars and you can swap the chip around to cars.
You can use wire connectors on retro chips and within a few minutes also have them swapped around..
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#18

(9th-Oct-19, 10:51 PM)JasonB Wrote:  I'm not even sure whether it would be compatible with a digital powerbase.

Yes, should be fine - although the ARC Pro powerbases in the Platinum set and upgrade kit (powerbase-controllers-power supply) won't like it without a modification. You'd probably want to go through the powerbase on two lanes just to look neat.

I have pondered digital rally / Targa Florio tracks over the years. My first (and only) routed track project was a single-lane analogue rally stage. I think for digital you would want to have a mix of single and two lane sections otherwise there is little point. One thing I like about digital is taking different racing lines around a track, which you can do with the straight and curved lane-changers, plus using a pit entry piece coming out of a single lane section. You might find different cars are quicker on different lines... or certainly have fun finding out!

Ghost cars don't quite work in a true prototypical rally scenario, but they would be fun - especially with single-lane sections. Yes, ghost cars are a different challenge to human racers, but they don't make mistakes and crash - and that can make it a difficult challenge to overtake. In designing a track for ghost car racing - or 'racing line' running - you want a good mix of left and right turns so it's not an advantage just to stay in one lane.

I would like to try a long rally time-trial with RCS64 software. There are great simulations with tyres losing grip as they wear, weather changes with a huge impact on grip and braking - as well as the effects of a reduced fuel load (you get more power). It is a fabulous piece of software that could really bring alive solo running against the clock. With deteriorating grip levels, you would definitely find the racing line changes from one lane to the other in some corners - as we find racing on our big layouts at WHO/digital.
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#19

(10th-Oct-19, 09:05 AM)Skogis Wrote:  The minus with digital is those chips. 

But i guess you could run digital and have pitlanes to change into a new part of the track. 
If it is worth it - that is a different case. 

There is so much things to take into consideration. Since i will drive on it alone i will mostly do timed runs. I like the pace cars. But they are mostly just "traffic" and not a real challenge like a human would be. At least I have not figured that out yet.
I imagne that a one slot track will give more lenght to the track aswell.  Bigsmile

Have you ever made a "rallytrack"? I see that Rallyhub have made some incredible pieces. But I those are routed tracks.

Do you have any experience with routed tracks? 

Regards SK

Yes, Rallyhub's tracks are amazing, and yes they are routed, I believe.

I've made single lane tracks before, both with a single Scalextric classic crossover which means you drive both lanes in the same direction, and with the rally loops that SCX used to make which mean you drive both lanes but in the opposite direction. I preferred the latter, but both give you double the track length.

But I prefer racing, so generally I've made two lane tracks.

I have a little experience with routed tracks, I helped to build a couple, and have raced on a few, but I'm no expert.

There are a lot of options, and it can sometimes seem like a bewildering number of ifs and buts. But I always think of making a track as being an interesting journey, rather than a final destination. Nobody can plan the perfect track, not even the most experienced racers. We all tend to plan things out carefully, build the track, test it, race on it, change any parts we don't like, give it a couple of months, and then start to add permanent scenery. After a year or two, we're usually ready to start a new track, apply the lessons we've learned, and build something better, or just different, so the process starts again.

That's all part of the fun. Thumbup
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#20

(10th-Oct-19, 09:05 AM)Skogis Wrote:  But i guess you could run digital and have pitlanes to change into a new part of the track. 

Yes, there are some interesting possibilties.

This is a digital tri oval and single lane rally track combined. Obviously some significant "butchering" of track pieces would be required.

   
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